THE BOOKS

Volume 1: Chicago

Having moved 4000 miles from Bristol, England, to the metroplis that is Chicago, stepping into Graham Crackers Comics was like walking into Willy Wonka's factory.  See, where' I'm from, real life comic book shops like this are few-and-far-between.  I was itching to start my first pull list and finally experience the customer-service made famous by The Simpson's Comic Book Guy.  Except that never happened.  I was warmly welcomed and only a matter of weeks later, organizing the inaugural Ladies' night.  With five brothers and few female friends into comics, I had no idea just how many female readers were out there - no idea how many I would meet during my short time living in America.  Since that first event, GCC Ladies' Night has grown from a handful of strangers sitting around a table, to a close group of friends reaty to take Ladies' Night to the next level with an anthology of our own.​

 

With the ever increasing popularity of creator owned titles, self published books and zines, and of course the internet, more and more people are picking up comics away from the stereotypes that have put so many off in the past.  If we can get comics into the right hands, the hands of people as unique and complex as the world around us, we have a real chance to change the comics industry for the better.

 

So thank you to Graham Crackers Comics for giving us a home and thank you for your interest in Ladies' Night Anthology.

 

Hannah K Chapman

Founder of Ladies' Night

Volume 2: Death & Prom

Death alone could easily fill an endless series of anthologies. Just as the event itself is inevitable, every creator tackles death as a subject. Prom on the other hand, is something that many would rather avoid revisiting. Even if you never attended prom, missing this often uneventful milestone can be formative in the vacuum it leaves behind. The concept rarely lives up to the reality, which makes it a uniquely attractive challenge to writers. Prom is almost always the setting for the climax of any film with teenaged protagonists. It’s like filmmakers are trying their best to bring tension and gravitas to an event that for most of us was filled with cheesy music, bad dates, and overly expensive outfits. We keep coming back to the subject of prom not because of its effect on us, but because it didn’t really matter much in the end, and we’re still a little disappointed. Like an endless loop, the fiction of prom is what inspires us to revisit the subject time and again, reality never capable of catching up to our imaginations.

 

Accepting the fact that prom would never be as good as what we anticipated or remembered, we decided that incorporating death might help add the suspense that movies told us we could expect. Death & Prom together inspired our creators to tackle many genres: comedy, horror, science-fiction, and of course romance. These twelve short comics are without a doubt more exciting and memorable than your real prom could ever be, and it cost less than the flower corsage that died on your wrist before the last dance.

 

Megan Byrd

Editor-in-Chief

Volume 3: How to Magic

Despite our best efforts to produce an effective spell for creating comics, we have failed to determine the exact ingredients and steps necessary. The same elements exist in varying degrees each time: extensive contemplation, planning over many moons, necessary and frequent attempts at mind-reading, trying, and trying again. What you hold in your hand is the culmination of ten magical collaborations, each one resulting in a unique sequential glamour. It is difficult to replicate the formula for creating comics because it seems incredibly simple, yet remains elusive and challenging even for the most experienced conjurers. It is nothing short of magical.

 

And you have not yet read them! That is when the most unexpected charms come into existence. The power contained within this tome is not properly activated without being visually absorbed, resulting in unexpected emotions and if properly conjured, will inspire a  desire to create your own comics. Proceed with caution, and should our attempts to charm you succeed, collaborative experimentation is encouraged.

 

Megan Byrd

Editor-in-Chief

 

Volume 4: Eat It Up

Nearly every fan of comics can tell you firsthand about over-indulgence. Maybe it is a tale about a pile of unread books growing larger on the nightstand, or the carefully organized collection of bookmarked webcomics. Perhaps it is buying yet another nerdy t-shirt. When it comes to our geek passions, it is easy for our eyes to be bigger than our bellies; buy just one more issue, play one more level, binge watch another season. Time, space, devotion, and of course money, these are the prices we pay for the content we crave, and our appetites are rarely sated.

 

Not unlike the ubiquitous nature of fast food delivery, we live in an age where it is easy to have too much of a good thing; we practically have replicators to deliver stories on demand. It is both satisfying and at times overwhelming. More creators are reaching their audiences through the internet, but it can still be difficult to find what you’re looking for in the smorgasbord of the world wide web, a buffet of endlessly updating content.


New tastes, and the creators bringing them to the table, can still be difficult to find, especially when what they serve is still rare. Getting in the kitchen and finding collaborators isn’t easy either. Eat It Up is filled with stories from new voices, and explores consumption of all the things we crave - sexually, intellectually, and of course, the culinary. We hope you have an appetite for something new.

Megan Byrd

Editor-in-Chief

 

© 2023 by MICHELLE WILLIAMSON. Proudly Created with Wix.com

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